Canadian Medical Hall of Fame

  2016 CMHF Awardees meet the 2017 Laureates: READ MORE

   

Canadian Medical Hall of Fame

Recognizing and celebrating Canadian heroes whose work has advanced health, here and around the world, and inspires the pursuit of careers in the health sciences.

Honouring Excellence. Preserving History. Connecting Generations.

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In 1985, Bergeron began his search for rapid molecular (DNA-based) methods to accelerate diagnosis of infectious diseases, which has reduced the time of diagnosis from ≥48 to <1h.  This tremendous advance enables physicians to identify microbes and their antibiotic resistance genes and treat infectious diseases almost immediately, saving lives and promoting effective and sustainable use of antibiotics.  Building on this breakthrough, and working with a transdisciplinary team, Bergeron has developed technologies for detecting and identifying dangerous bacteria in health facilities, helping to contain or prevent dissemination and antibiotic resistance, a priority of the United Nations (2016).  Presently, he and his team are developing portable point-of-care (POC) diagnostic devices that can be used to bring easy-to-use health monitoring to men and women worldwide.Bergeron’s contributions include a protective vaginal gel “the Invisible Condom®” against the AIDS virus and other STDs, preventing neonatal meningitis, controlling the dissemination of C. difficile and MRSA infections in hospitals, development of unique safe water molecular analytical technologies, parliamentary presentations, and service on national and international boards and committees. He has authored hundreds of articles and holds 30 issued patents.  Bergeron has been an inspiration to thousands of students and researchers, and his achievements have helped build the economy of his province and the nation. As a symbol of his wide-ranging achievements, one of Bergeron’s devices for molecular analysis may be carried by astronauts on their Mars mission of 2032.                                           (W.L.Hoth)
2017 Inductee
PCs play important roles in brain functions related to pain and behavior, in organ growth and development, in endocrine/neuroendocrine regulations, and in sugar and body fat homeostasis. PCs are implicated in many diseases including metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity, cancer, atherosclerosis, dyslipidemia, and Alzheimer’s, as well as viral and bacterial infections.  Dr. Chrétien discovered a beneficial PCSK9 mutation present only in French Canadian families which protected them from cardiovascular diseases.  His work exemplifies: ¨From bedside to bench and back.”The first French-Canadian physician elected Fellow of the Royal Society of London and the second Québécois francophone to receive a Doctorate Honoris Causa from the Université Descartes de Paris, Dr. Chrétien is Officer of the Order of Canada, Officier de L’Ordre National du Québec¨ and de ¨La Légion d’Honneur de France¨.  Dr. Chrétien has authored 602 publications, and in the 1980s, he was the seventh most cited scientist worldwide.  A builder and leader, Dr. Chrétien acted as scientific director of two research institutes, the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal and the Loeb Health Research Institute (Ottawa), boosting their growth and enhancing their productivity. He is a fierce defender of scientific freedom in both word and deed, working tirelessly to convince governments to invest in scientific research.  Dr. Chrétien has built a unified career around his own prohormone theory, bridging basic and clinical research with immediate benefits for patients. His discoveries have helped improve our understanding of human and animal physiology and have enhanced our ability to combat pathologies that afflict humankind. His skillful, diplomatic, and persistent promotion of research funding has helped transform Canada's research landscape for decades to come. (W.L.Hoth)
2017 Inductee
Dr. Goldbloom achieved international recognition as a pioneer of family participation in the care of hospitalized children, having introduced one of the first Care-by-Parent Units in Canada.  He has authored hundreds of articles and seven books, including Pediatric Clinical Skills, a popular textbook for medical undergraduates and postgraduates.  He has taught and lectured in many countries, providing guidance on issues of health care for children.  Chair or president of many boards and committees, Dr. Goldbloom has received many accolades including four honorary degrees and the F.N.G. Starr Award.  In 2006, the Dr. Richard B. Goldbloom Research and Clinical Care Pavilion at the IWK Health Centre was named in his honour.As physician and educator, Dr. Goldbloom has long served Halifax, but he was also one of the city’s leading patrons, supporting the Atlantic and Nova Scotia symphonies, the Waterfront Development Corporation of Halifax, and the Discovery Centre, an interactive children’s museum of science and technology.In 2003, Dr. Goldbloom received a Canada Post National Literacy Award for his work promoting child literacy. To this day, every newborn in Halifax receives a free Read to Me! bag containing books, a CD with lullabies and nursery rhymes, a baby’s first library card, and a Family Reading Guide available in several languages, including Mi’kmaw.          A physician who helped build the culture of his city, Dr. Goldbloom has promoted the well-being of his fellow citizens in many ways, but above all, he has promoted the well-being of children throughout Canada and the world.   (W.L.Hoth)
2017 Inductee
The clarity and compassion of his defense of medicare deserve to be remembered:As a society, [we] are aware that the trauma of illness, the pain of surgery, the slow decline to death, are burdens enough for the human being to bear without the added burden of medical or hospital bills penalizing the patient at the moment of vulnerability. The Canadian people determined that they should band together to pay medical bills and hospital bills when they were well and income earning. Health services [are] a fundamental need, like education, which Canadians could meet collectively and pay for through taxes.Born to a poor Irish family near Montreal in 1898, Justice Hall studied law in Saskatchewan and served as Chief Justice of the province (appeal division) before his appointment to the Supreme Court in 1962.  In 1961 at the request of the Diefenbaker government, Justice Hall led the Royal Commission on Health Services interviewing hundreds of witnesses and bringing attention to needs of ordinary men and women living with illness or injury.Asked in 1965 by Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson whether Tommy Douglas’ Saskatchewan experiment could work nationwide Justice Hall responded, “most definitely”.  The National Medical Care Insurance Act was passed on December 8, 1966 by an overwhelming vote of 177 to 2, with a starting date of July 1, 1968Justice Hall lived to 96 and was active in defending the rights of indigenous people and persons with disabilities.  Described as “an establishment radical,” Justice Hall understood power and the intricacies of politics but repeatedly sided with the common man and the needs of the poor.  Challenged by opponents who believed expanded health care was too expensive Justice Hall responded, “The only thing more expensive than good health care is no health care.”  We remember Justice Hall today as a father of medicare whose work helped form our national identity.(author credit: W.L.Hoth)
2017 Inductee
Dr. Hayden moved to British Columbia from Harvard Medical School in 1983 to join the medical faculty of UBC. He currently serves as President of Global R&D and Chief Scientific Officer for TEVA Pharmaceuticals headquartered in Israel. Dr. Hayden is the most cited author in the world for HD and has written more than 840 peer-reviewed publications and invited submissions.  His research into the mechanisms of HD have produced reliable predictive tests and new opportunities for prevention and treatment. His related research into mutations of the protein ABCA1 may hold promising applications for the understanding and treatment of diabetes and atherosclerosis.  Dr. Hayden has declared, “No diseases are hopeless anymore. The way I see them is that their secrets have just not yet been identified.” His work in deciphering vast and complex genomic and cellular data is helping to unveil secrets of intractable disease. Dr. Hayden’s genetic research has also generated new approaches to the problem of adverse drug reactions (ADR). The Canadian Pharmacogenomics Network for Drug Safety (CPNDS), co-founded by Dr. Hayden, focuses on the development of genetic biomarkers for drug safety, addressing one of the great challenges in modern health care.  Recent results of this work include development of personalized dosing recommendations and cautionary labeling to reduce ADR.       Much honoured and widely admired by his professional colleagues, Dr. Hayden’s research, medical networks, drug development, and pioneering work in multiple fields testify to the continuing bounty of genetic research for improving human health in Canada and worldwide.     (W.L.Hoth)
2017 Inductee
With colleagues in immunology, Dr. Simons elucidated important mechanisms of human interactions with the environment that lead to allergen sensitization and allergic disease, and investigated new approaches to immune modulation.Many of her 570 peer-reviewed publications are widely cited. She has also edited or co-edited eight textbooks, including the major reference textbook Middleton’s Allergy: Principles and Practice. She has given more than 300 invited research presentations at major congresses, universities, and research institutes on six continents.Over four decades Dr. Simons played an important role in building the specialty of Allergy & Clinical Immunology nationally and internationally by serving as Chair of the Clinical Immunology Specialty Committee of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, President of the Canadian Society of Allergy & Clinical Immunology, and President of the American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology. During a 15-year commitment to the World Allergy Organization, she served several terms on the Board of Directors and chaired international research and education initiatives on anaphylaxis.A Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, Dr. Simons has ­­­­received more than 50 major awards and honours, including the Canadian Medical Association Medal of Service, the American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology Distinguished Clinician Award, and the World Allergy Organization Scientific Achievement Award.Her dedication to scholarship, innovative research, education, and knowledge translation have helped transform allergic disease management from empiricism to science.  Her achievements have helped to mitigate the impact of the global allergy epidemic and alleviate suffering worldwide.                                                                         
2017 Inductee